Events

Events

Food and Death

14 May 2014 15:30 - 16:30

Two talks by leading food historians discuss the celebratory foods used to commemorate the dead – followed by a tea break with Yorkshire buns and biscuits prepared by Peter Brears

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  • Food for all souls, Laura Mason

Observed in many places, All Souls is celebrated with particular exuberance in Mexico, where sugar is formed and coloured in fantastical shapes to commemorate the dead. Food historian Laura Mason will discuss some of the places and foods associated with this festival.

  • Funeral Teas, Peter Brears

For centuries, funerals have been celebrated with both feasts and ceremonial foods, including York funeral biscuits and buns.  Peter Brears will describe the food, and we will try samples over tea.

 

Laura Mason is a food historian.  Her work includes Traditional Foods of Britain(with Catherine Brown), Sugar Plums and Sherbert, a history of sugar confectionery in Britain since the Middle Ages, and Food and the Rites of Passage which explores foods customary at childbirth, marriage and death.

Peter Brears is one of Britain’s leading food historians. Formerly director of York’s Castle Museum, and for 15 years director of Leeds City Museums, he has carried out research projects at many historic venues, including Hampton Court Palace, Belvoir Castle, Petworth and Harewood House.

 

Research Centre for the Social Sciences, University of York

 

Booking Needed:

Telephone: 01904 323041

Email: info@beforeidiefestival.co.uk

Price: FREE

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Celestial Bodies: A workshop discussion of death in outer space

14 May 2014 17:00 - 18:00

With greater numbers travelling further for longer, issues surrounding mortality in space travel are ever more timely. One-way missions to Mars are currently being planned, so death in space will no longer be a possibility – it will be a certainty.

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This session will provide you with an opportunity to discuss the practicalities, legalities and moralities of death and dying in space. Could you accept a one-way ticket to Mars, knowing that you would eventually end your life off-world? How will the funeral practices be adapted for interplanetary travel? What are the implications for conceptualisations of life, death and the afterlife?

 

Kelly Benneworth-Gray is a Lecturer in Sociology at the University of York interested in language and social interaction and how psychological experience is socially mediated.

 

Research Centre for the Social Sciences, University of York

 

Booking Needed:

Telephone: 01904 323041

Email: info@beforeidiefestival.co.uk

Price: FREE

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Recording loss: the use of photography as a method for documenting death and dying

15 May 2014 14:00 - 15:30

Representations of dying are often invisible. Death is something that happens elsewhere.  Perhaps this is what lends photographic portraits of death and dying in contemporary societies such visceral power, such affective intensity.

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In this event, Daryl Martin will offer an analysis of different accounts of death and dying by contemporary photographers, and Colin Gray will reflect on the death of his mother and father, as represented in ‘In Sickness and In Health’ and his new series of photographs ‘Do Us Part’ (working title).There will be time for Q&A after these talks as well as the opportunity for informal conversation over tea and cake (3.30-4:00pm)

 

Colin Gray is a commercial and fine art photographer whose book, In Sickness and in Health was published by Steidi in 2011. Daryl Martin is a Lecturer in the Department of Sociology at the University of York.

 

Research Centre for the Social Sciences, University of York

 

Booking Needed:

Telephone: 01904 323041

Email: info@beforeidiefestival.co.uk

Price: FREE

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Engaging the Public with the Landscapes of Death

15 May 2014 10:00 - 16:00

This free workshop discusses how to develop local community involvement in your churchyard or cemetery.

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King’s Manor Exhibition Square, York YO1 7EP

 

Booking Needed:

Email: gareth.beale@york.ac.uk

Price: FREE

Music and Poetry to Die For

15 May 2014 19:30 - 21:30

Dying and bereavement have engendered some of the most deeply felt words and music ever written.

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The breadth of ideas and emotions is surprisingly varied, and certainly far from only doom and gloom. The programme will feature solo songs whose poetry explores the impact of bereavement, permission to die, and release and hope, performed by soprano Alison Wray, accompanied by Tim Tozer.   One of the North’s foremost poets, James Nash will read some of his own poems, including sonnets inspired by research at the University of Yorkon coma. The Chanticleer Singers conducted by Jane Sturmheit will present the songs they would like to hear at their funerals.

 

National Centre for Early Music, St Margaret’s Church, Walmgate, York, YO1 9TL

 

Booking Needed:

Telephone:   01904 658338

Price: £8

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Humanist and Non-Religious Funerals

15 May 2014 10:00 - 13:00

The death of anyone we have known and loved is no less sad, shocking or painful for those who live without religion.

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A funeral director is most likely to deal with the practical arrangements of a funeral, but we are all entitled to specify the kind of funeral ceremony we want, be it a burial or cremation.

A Humanist funeral ceremony will:

  • focus on the person who has died
  • allow relatives and friends to express their feelings and to share their memories
  • have warmth and sincerity: many people find them helpful and are pleased to have provided a ceremony their loved ones would have wanted
  • celebrate the life of the person who has died
  • be more appropriate for those who have lived without religion

We are accredited Funeral Celebrants with the British Humanist Association. Friendly, trained, experienced and insured, we are sensitive to your wishes, yet ready to give clear guidance and to answer your questions.

 

Come and have a chat with us and find out more, we would be delighted to meet you and you may be pleasantly surprised.

 

Further Information:

There will be a short presentation and answer session at 10.30 a.m. and 12.00 p.m.

 

Friargate Quaker Meeting House in the Library

No Booking Needed, Please just come along or contact the below for further information.

Steve Emmett   

Tel: 01653 658799 

Mob: 07804 450742

email: celebrant@humanistfunerals.org   

 

Sharon Kent

Tel: 01757 242900

Mob: 07977 208595

email: sharon@huddlestonehouse.co.uk

Price: FREE

Thinking About Death: A Symposium

15 May 2014 11:00 - 13:00

A varied selection of short talks exploring the meaning of death and how it is understood and experienced both at an individual level and societally.

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Children and Grief,  Sue Gill

An introduction to the work Cruse Bereavement Care is doing with bereaved children and young people in York and North Yorkshire.   Every 30 minutes the parent of a child under 18 dies and all children need an appropriate response from their community (family, school etc).

 

Music at Funerals, John Francis Moss

‘Our music’ may be an expression of our lives, but what choices do people make when music needs to be an expression of our death?  In a short paper, John Francis Moss explores some of the meanings behind the choice of music at funerals, and suggests how best to use music within the shape, structure and context of a largely spoken ritual.

 

What is Death?,  Stephen Holland

Defining death has become controversial because of developments in medical technology.  As a result, whether certain people are alive or dead can be unclear.  In this talk, a distinctive way of understanding death is presented and applied to one category of patients, namely, those in a permanent vegetative state.

 

Family experiences of grief and funerals when vegetative relatives die:  Developing a HealthTalkOnline Resource, Jenny Kitzinger

When someone dies after having been maintained in a long-term coma, the experience of grief and of planning and experiencing a funeral can be very different.  This talk draws on filmed interviews with family members talking about their experiences.

 

Death and Decision-Making, Sue Wilkinson

What are the obstacles people face in making decisions about their own future end-of life care?  Based on her research with the charity Compassion in Dying, Sue will talk about the difficulties people face when they try to plan ahead – and how to overcome them.

 

Research Centre for the Social Sciences, University of York

 

Booking Needed:

Telephone: 01904 323041

Email: info@beforeidiefestival.co.uk

Price: FREE

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The Work of the Coroner

16 May 2014 10:00 - 11:30

The care with which our dead are treated is a mark of how civilised a society we are. Much goes on for understandable reasons behind closed doors. For this reason there is a special responsibility placed on those entrusted with this work and the authorities who supervise it to ensure that the bodies of the dead are treated with the utmost care and respect. That is what bereaved and loved ones are entitled to expect and what society at large demands” (Charles Haddon-Cave, QC)

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This talk will cover:

1.     General standards that you can expect during a coroner’s investigation

2.     Overview of coroners and investigations

3.     Starting an investigation

4.     The post mortem examination

5.     Release of the body for a funeral and administration of the estate

6.     Organs and tissue

7.     The Inquest

8.     Investigations where the process may be different

 

The speakers are Derek Winter and Vicky Ross. 

 

Derek Winter was appointed Her Majesty’s Coroner for the City of Sunderland in 2003.  Educated at Hull University (LLB (Hons)), he qualified as a Solicitor in 1983 and became a Solicitor Advocate specialising in Family Law.  A  Council Member of the Coroner’s Society for England and Wales, he is also its Assistant Secretary and  Archivist of Reports to Prevent Future Deaths

 

Vicky Ross has worked for Northumbria Police in a number of roles after graduating from Northumbria University in 2004.  She became a Coroner’s Officer in January 2008 and has experiencing in dealing with a variety of deaths including deaths in the community, deaths in clinical and care settings, and deaths abroad – including deaths of military personnel.

 

Venue: Berrick Saul Lecture Room, University of York

 

Booking Needed:

Telephone: 01904 323041

Email: info@beforeidiefestival.co.uk

Price: FREE

Book Now